Information For Authors

Interested in submitting to this journal? We recommend that you review the About the Journal page for the journal's section policies, as well as the Author Guidelines. Authors need to register with the journal prior to submitting, or if already registered can simply log in and begin the five-step process.

Upcoming Issues

TitleIssue EditorsSubmission DateRelease Date
'depict' Marj Kibby16 June 201716 Aug. 2017
'history' Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Lloyd Carpenter11 Aug. 201711 Oct. 2017
'north' Sandra Harding and Richard Nile6 Oct. 20176 Dec. 2017

'depict'

Inspired by reflections on John Berger's Ways of Seeing on the occasion of his recent death, the M/C Journal 'depict' issue looks at the other side of the communication event - ways of representing, portraying, illustrating, rendering.

While articles could include the depiction of social groupings in the media, it would also cover a wider range of topics such as:

  • Visual representation of data
  • Self-representation and branding
  • Visual depiction and power relations
  • Pictograms and public communication
  • Internet memes and other forms of visual rhetoric
  • Visual communication in social media
  • Digital images and everyday aesthetics
  • Professional journalism and amateur news content

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 16 June 2017
  • Release date: 16 Aug. 2017
  • Editors: Marj Kibby

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to depict@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'history'

For many, the very idea of 'history' calls into question narratives of the past, distant and disconnected from our contemporary moment, and out of tune with the media-centred world of our post-2000 popular culture. This approach to history, however, is based on profound misconceptions, and does not take into account the fact that the present is history: we experience our historical moment via multiple and multi-faceted media practices, from using social media to watching movies, from watching television to consuming food. The past is, in turn, never far removed from our contemporary practices, informing not only the way we live now, but the ways in which our futures evolve. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to redress the critical balance, and re-evaluate and re-vision the notion of history in connection to media and culture.

Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to:

  • representing history in literature, television, and film
  • history and popular culture
  • history as 'narrative'
  • history, media, and communication
  • history and social practices
  • history and national identity
  • history and gender
  • historiographies
  • history and popular iconography
  • historical (mis-)representations
  • food and other cultural histories
  • history, folklore, and myth
  • writing history

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 11 Aug. 2017
  • Release date: 11 Oct. 2017
  • Editors: Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Lloyd Carpenter

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to history@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'north'

People become "conscious of entering a strange country" when they travel North, observed George Orwell. North is the cardinal point of the compass but also a navigational oddity upon the deviation between Magnetic North and True North. In popular culture North is frequently cast as the "land beyond" as it is in Game of Thrones. It defines the continent of North America, but is also a line of demarcation for the "hermit kingdom", Britain's province in Ireland, and the North island of New Zealand. Nordic tales tell of Vikings and the Pagan North, while "nordicity" refers to degrees of northern-ness as measured by polar values in Canada. In China, North is signified by the Black Turtle, while in Russia it divides between "Far North" and "Extreme North." Seven centuries of cartographic convention has placed North at the top of maps, but North remains elusive: Norway is in western Scandinavia, North Africa is on the Southern Mediterranean and shares Egypt with the Middle East, while the Far East is the Near North in Australia where "your compass spins frighteningly," as the poet Judith Wright observed.

We invite contributions on North as a rich imaginary, including but not limited to considerations on:

  • Cardinal points
  • Orientations
  • Strange countries
  • Magnetic deviations
  • True North
  • Up North
  • Norse legends
  • Northern lights
  • Northern Borders
  • Cartographic imagination
  • Polar regions
  • Torrid zones (tropics)

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 6 Oct. 2017
  • Release date: 6 Dec. 2017
  • Editors: Sandra Harding and Richard Nile

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to north@journal.media-culture.org.au.