Information For Authors

Interested in submitting to this journal? We recommend that you review the About the Journal page for the journal's section policies, as well as the Author Guidelines. Authors need to register with the journal prior to submitting, or if already registered can simply log in and begin the five-step process.

Upcoming Issues

TitleIssue EditorsSubmission DateRelease Date
'depict' Marj Kibby16 June 201716 Aug. 2017
'history' Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Lloyd Carpenter11 Aug. 201711 Oct. 2017
'north' Sandra Harding and Richard Nile6 Oct. 20176 Dec. 2017
'trans-seriality' Anne Kustritz12 Jan. 201814 Mar. 2018
'automediality' Emma Maguire and Ümit Kennedy23 Feb. 201825 Apr. 2018
'protest' Scott East and Ben Hightower15 June 201815 Aug. 2018
'walking' Amy Mead and Melanie Pryor10 Aug. 201810 Oct. 2018
'nineties' Jay Daniel Thompson and Sally Breen5 Oct. 20185 Dec. 2018

'depict'

Inspired by reflections on John Berger's Ways of Seeing on the occasion of his recent death, the M/C Journal 'depict' issue looks at the other side of the communication event - ways of representing, portraying, illustrating, rendering.

While articles could include the depiction of social groupings in the media, it would also cover a wider range of topics such as:

  • Visual representation of data
  • Self-representation and branding
  • Visual depiction and power relations
  • Pictograms and public communication
  • Internet memes and other forms of visual rhetoric
  • Visual communication in social media
  • Digital images and everyday aesthetics
  • Professional journalism and amateur news content

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 16 June 2017
  • Release date: 16 Aug. 2017
  • Editors: Marj Kibby

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to depict@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'history'

For many, the very idea of 'history' calls into question narratives of the past, distant and disconnected from our contemporary moment, and out of tune with the media-centred world of our post-2000 popular culture. This approach to history, however, is based on profound misconceptions, and does not take into account the fact that the present is history: we experience our historical moment via multiple and multi-faceted media practices, from using social media to watching movies, from watching television to consuming food. The past is, in turn, never far removed from our contemporary practices, informing not only the way we live now, but the ways in which our futures evolve. This issue of M/C Journal seeks to redress the critical balance, and re-evaluate and re-vision the notion of history in connection to media and culture.

Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to:

  • representing history in literature, television, and film
  • history and popular culture
  • history as 'narrative'
  • history, media, and communication
  • history and social practices
  • history and national identity
  • history and gender
  • historiographies
  • history and popular iconography
  • historical (mis-)representations
  • food and other cultural histories
  • history, folklore, and myth
  • writing history

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 11 Aug. 2017
  • Release date: 11 Oct. 2017
  • Editors: Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Lloyd Carpenter

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to history@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'north'

People become "conscious of entering a strange country" when they travel North, observed George Orwell. North is the cardinal point of the compass but also a navigational oddity upon the deviation between Magnetic North and True North. In popular culture North is frequently cast as the "land beyond" as it is in Game of Thrones. It defines the continent of North America, but is also a line of demarcation for the "hermit kingdom", Britain's province in Ireland, and the North island of New Zealand. Nordic tales tell of Vikings and the Pagan North, while "nordicity" refers to degrees of northern-ness as measured by polar values in Canada. In China, North is signified by the Black Turtle, while in Russia it divides between "Far North" and "Extreme North." Seven centuries of cartographic convention has placed North at the top of maps, but North remains elusive: Norway is in western Scandinavia, North Africa is on the Southern Mediterranean and shares Egypt with the Middle East, while the Far East is the Near North in Australia where "your compass spins frighteningly," as the poet Judith Wright observed.

We invite contributions on North as a rich imaginary, including but not limited to considerations on:

  • Cardinal points
  • Orientations
  • Strange countries
  • Magnetic deviations
  • True North
  • Up North
  • Norse legends
  • Northern lights
  • Northern Borders
  • Cartographic imagination
  • Polar regions
  • Torrid zones (tropics)

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 6 Oct. 2017
  • Release date: 6 Dec. 2017
  • Editors: Sandra Harding and Richard Nile

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to north@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'trans-seriality'

The concept of transmedia story worlds unfolding across complex serial narrative structures has become increasingly important to the study of modern media industries and audience communities; yet the precise connections between transmedia networks, narrative processes, and serial structures often remain underdeveloped. This issue of M/C Journal opens a conversation on the intersection of these three concepts and their implications for a variety of disciplines, artistic practices, and philosophies. By re-thinking these concepts from fresh perspectives, the collection challenges scholars to consider how a wide range of scholarly, aesthetic, and social phenomena might be productively thought through using the overlapping lenses of transmedia, seriality, and narrativity. Thus the collection gathers scholars from life writing, sports, film studies, cultural anthropology, theater, fine arts, media studies, and literature, all of whom find common ground at this fruitful crossroads.

This breadth also challenges the narrow definition of transmedia as a specialised term to describe current developments in corporate mass media products that seek to exploit the affordances of hybrid digital media environments. Thus, many of the contributions to this issue push the boundaries of what has traditionally been studied as transmedia, as well as the limits of what may be considered a serial structure or even a story. For example, these papers imagine how an autobiography may also be a digital concept album unfolding in reverse, how academically-informed theatre breaks down boundaries between disciplinary and mediated spaces, and how studying sports fandom as a long series of transmedia narrative elements encourages scholars to grapple with the unique transmedia structures assembled by audiences of non-fictional story worlds. Setting these experimental offerings into dialogue with entries that approach the study of transmedia in a more established manner provides the basis for building bridges between such recognised conversations in new media studies and potential collaborations with other disciplines and areas of media studies.

The issue builds upon papers collected from the last four years of the International Transmedia Serial Narration seminar, which held sessions in Paris, Amsterdam, and Utrecht, with interdisciplinary speakers from the USA, Australia, France, Belgium, and the Netherlands. After two successful special issues primarily collecting the French language papers in TV/Series (2014) and Itinéraires (2016), this issue seeks to bring the insights of our project to a wider audience by publishing the English-language papers and inviting a broader international dialogue.

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 12 Jan. 2018
  • Release date: 14 Mar. 2018
  • Editor: Anne Kustritz

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to trans-seriality@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'automediality'

How do people mediate their identities, selves and experiences? How do media forms and conventions limit or facilitate the possibilities for particular kinds of selfhood to be articulated? If 'autobiography' has denoted a way to write the self from the location of the self, automediality points to the range of media forms and technologies through which people engage in digital, visual, filmic, performative, textual, and transmediated forms of documenting, constructing and presenting the self.

Scholars of life narrative warn us that "the self" is not a unified and pre-existing entity that can simply be transcribed or translated through media. Rather, the self is brought into being through writing-or mediation. Media technologies like the camera, the diary, social media platforms, and books each have conventions, affordances, abilities and limits that both enable and restrict the kinds of self-presentation that are possible. Particular media bring particular subjectivities to life. Examining such sites and modes of automediality can tell us about the ways in which 'technologies and subjectivity' are connected (Smith and Watson).

Investigations of automediality may include, but are not limited to:

  • the platforms, mediums and technologies of automediality
  • the affordances of automediality for alternative narratives and identities
  • the vulnerabilities of mediated narratives and identities
  • the mediated self as brand/consumable product
  • automediality as lasting/permanent or ephemeral
  • methodologies for investigating the mediated self, particularly in the context of digital media

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 23 Feb. 2018
  • Release date: 25 Apr. 2018
  • Editors: Emma Maguire and Ümit Kennedy

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to automediality@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'protest'

Protest signals disagreement or dissatisfaction. It is a means of self-expression in opposition to particular events, policies or situations. This issue of M/C Journal is inspired by developments in contemporary protest: the scale and scope of protests, law and the policing and censorship of protest, and emerging spaces, methods and sites of protest.

In this issue we host a discussion crossing disciplinary, geographic, and conceptual boundaries which involves a range of academic, activist, and artistic voices on the utility, significance and efficacy of historical and contemporary protest movements.

Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to:

  • Protest solidarities (protest institutions, protest culture, 'professional' protestors, protest as residence, national and global protest movements)
  • Counter-protest (protest rivals and conflicting protest ideologies)
  • Protest and dissention (resistance and discordant communities)
  • Policing protest (changing legal cultures, censorship, public space, and penalties)
  • Protest and activism (challenges and success of societal reform: environment, polity, economics, governance)
  • Literature, art and culture (protest art, culture-jamming, performance, documentaries & film)
  • Protest organisation (protest form and function)
  • Protest and the media (media as protest, representation of protest)
  • Not-In-My-BackYard (NIMBY) oppositions
  • Emerging forms and typologies (hologram protest)
  • Translation of protest (understanding protest, inter/intra-cultural exchanges, protest across borders, protest narratives)
  • Evaluating protest (utility, efficacy, viability, functionality)
  • Technology and protest ('non-lethal' weapons, social media, online activism)

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 15 June 2018
  • Release date: 15 Aug. 2018
  • Editors: Scott East and Ben Hightower

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to protest@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'walking'

Why do we walk? Walking traverses boundaries of the physical, political, artistic, narrated, literary, and psychological, and can be deployed as a complex practice in an increasingly digitised world. In this issue, we examine the contemporary practices and representations of walking. We encourage work with an interest in the hybrid, the interdisciplinary, the intersectional; that looks to fields as diverse as feminist studies, life writing, nature writing, anthropology and fictocriticism.

We think walking can be an act, a response, a methodology, a transgression. Areas of investigation may include, but are not limited to:

  • Walking and the body
  • Walking and selfhood
  • Walking and gendered spaces
  • Walking and urban spaces
  • Walking and feminism
  • Walking and mobility/disability
  • Walking and mental illness
  • Walking as meditation, contemplative walking
  • Walking as methodology, walking as artistic practice
  • Walking and the Anthropocene
  • Walking and the literary
  • Walking as resistance
  • Walking in film
  • Walking and cartography, affective geographies, psychogeography
  • Walking and nature writing

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 10 Aug. 2018
  • Release date: 10 Oct. 2018
  • Editors: Amy Mead and Melanie Pryor

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to walking@journal.media-culture.org.au.


'nineties'

In 2016, The New York Times published an article entitled "The Return of the '90s". In that article, journalist Alexander Fury wrote: "for those who lived through it, there was a sense of transience, of not only a century but of a millennium drawing to a close. Of both relentlessly looking forward to the promise of the brave and the new and back via an exhaustive sputtering of revivals."

Fury is correct: the 1990s was a transient, eclectic, unpredictable decade. The recent revival of the series Twin Peaks (originally screened in 1990-1) suggests that this decade has made a kind of "comeback", at least in the realm of popular culture.

This issue of M/C Journal will revisit the period spanning 1990 to 1999. Areas of investigation could include:

  • Shutting down the 20th Century: where did the 1980s end and the 1990s begin?
  • Paranoia: Y2K and otherwise tilting into the new millennium
  • Technological insurgence and the widespread emergence of the Internet
  • Grunge, alternative subcultures and 'Generation X'
  • Hybridity, globalisation and popular culture
  • High art/low art collapse and genre fluidity
  • The function of retro and nostalgia in, and about, the 1990s

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be double-blind refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 5 Oct. 2018
  • Release date: 5 Dec. 2018
  • Editors: Jay Daniel Thompson and Sally Breen

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to nineties@journal.media-culture.org.au.